1. image: Download

    Together, we can stop malnutrition, not just for one child, but for 15 million. We can end poverty, not just for one person, but for 50 million. Together we can break the cycle.
Spread the word ONE.ORG

    Together, we can stop malnutrition, not just for one child, but for 15 million. We can end poverty, not just for one person, but for 50 million. Together we can break the cycle.

    Spread the word ONE.ORG

     
  2. damegreywulf:

    From CARE:

    “Have you ever wondered what it’s like to live on $1.50 a day?

    Thousands of people across the United States, and tens of thousands across the world, will be asking themselves this question as they take action to raise awareness about global poverty by living on the equivalent of the…

     
  3. For many in the West, poverty is almost synonymous with hunger. Indeed, the announcement by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in 2009 that more than 1 billion people are suffering from hunger grabbed headlines in a way that any number of World Bank estimates of how many poor people live on less than a dollar a day never did.

    But is it really true? Are there really more than a billion people going to bed hungry each night? Our research on this question has taken us to rural villages and teeming urban slums around the world, collecting data and speaking with poor people about what they eat and what else they buy, from Morocco to Kenya, Indonesia to India. We’ve also tapped into a wealth of insights from our academic colleagues. What we’ve found is that the story of hunger, and of poverty more broadly, is far more complex than any one statistic or grand theory; it is a world where those without enough to eat may save up to buy a TV instead, where more money doesn’t necessarily translate into more food, and where making rice cheaper can sometimes even lead people to buy less rice.


     
  4. visualoop:

    Famine in Somalia

    Created by eLocal.com in partnership with The Washington Post

     
  5. image: Download

    How Banks Cause Hunger
     
  6. Hunger is an unforgivable disease because it is the easiest one to cure.
     
  7. My community remembers events and birthdays by times of hunger. We give the droughts names: “longoza” was the drought when many animals died; there was the drought of the “planes” because food was dropped from the air by planes, and one particularly bad drought was called “man who dies with money in his fist,” because, even if there was money, there was simply no food to purchase.


     
  8. A random poll of 10 underage girls in Toulepleu by aid group Save The Children U.K. in 2009 found that eight performed sexual acts for Benin peacekeepers on a regular basis in order to secure their most basic needs. “Eight of the 10 said they had ongoing sexual relationships with Beninese soldiers in exchange for food or lodging,” the diplomat wrote in the cable, citing information shared with the embassy by a protection officer.

     
  9. Guatemala’s elite has more helicopters per capita than any other country

    lysscguatemala:

    (admittedly in a mountainous terrain)

    But infant malnutrition rates in Guatemala, although improving, are still among the worst in the world. The contrast between the homes and lifestyles of the wealthy and of the poor, both urban and rural, remains stunning.

     
  10. 21:01 28th Aug 2011

    Notes: 24

    Reblogged from hiptipico

    Tags: guatemalahungerpoverty

    Guatemala’s leaders face hunger crisis

    lysscguatemala:

    Guatemala is one of the world’s most important producers of sugar bananas and coffee yet the country’s children suffer among the highest rates of malnutrition. Deborah Bonello reports on the causes and what needs to be done to eradicate hunger in the country.

     
  11. The struggle against starvation, violence and disease is also the struggle to understand and describe the world.

     
  12. my-little-thing:

    My birthday is August 21st. The best gift anyone could give me is a donation to the feeding program KUEF is beginning in the Kithoka region of Meru, Kenya. I have so many blessings in my life, one of them being the opportunity to spend 4 weeks in Meru this summer. At the two primary schools I’ve…

     
  13. forthosewhoseek:

Feeding the poor isn’t a crime. Challenging the status quo is.

    forthosewhoseek:

    Feeding the poor isn’t a crime. Challenging the status quo is.

     
  14. “In times of economic downturn, like our country now faces, we begin to fear that which we do not know. And many choose to point the blame for our economic problems on immigrants.


     
  15. “an empty stomach has no ears”